Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) said, “The sky is the daily bread of the eyes.”
Design by Meredith Eliassen, 2019.

Conversation:

Chirp! Emerson, chirp… chirp…

Chirp! Look! Chirp”

Chirp! Agreed!

Yep! The sky is the daily bread of the eyes.




Black and white studies…

December 12, 2018

Start

Dragonfly by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Carrot

Carrot by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Dahlia

Dahlia by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Maritime Plauts

Maritime plant by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Shakespeare

Bee and Tudor Rose by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Star Flower

“Star Plants” by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Yerba Buena

Yerba Buena by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Ideas need light to grow…

December 11, 2018

Ideas need

Ideas need light to grow… design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Ideas need light to grow… a conversation

Bird: And air!

Oak leaf: parvis e glandibus quercus

Lil’ Wum: Bird-brains… Translation: Tall oaks from little acorns grow… whew!

Merry VIV: Posterity explores ancestors through printed leaves.

During the Women’s March in 2016, and image of an acorn on a poster showed that buried ideas can grow. An idea can take centuries to unfold, yet appear to turn on like a lightbulb. Parvis e glandibus quercus means that great things often have small beginnings. This is an early variant of ‘mighty oaks from little acorns grow’ found in Geoffrey Chaucer’s epic tragedy of two lovers Troilus and Criseyde (1374),”as an ook cometh of a litel spyr” [meaning sapling] that came from the ancient Greeks via Boccaccio.

Bug Rap

Familiar things are comforting; that’s why little children like to hear the same stories over and over again. Lil’ Wum is actually the farmer’s friend, he helps to improve the soil and nurtures organisms and increases the amount of air and water that get into the soil and leaving behind castings that provide valuable fertilizer. A plant’s roots allow it to receive the nutrients that Lil’ Wum carries. What Lil’ Wum does not realize is that the bird flying above carries a seed that could become a great plant. Drawing by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

K-T-did: What’s up! Zit! Zit!

Lil’ Wum: Bu’d a buv

K-T-did: Yeh, Yeh… click

Dragonfly: Talk to me… Whush!

K-T-did: Lisp… lisp… zit! Click!

Dragonfly: Whush!

Bee: Buzz lisp… lisp… zit! Oh dang!

While the lil’ critters fretted, the “bud” dropped a seed that would grow tall.

Thistle

Meanwhile, the “bud” carried a maritime plant seed that grew into a giant thistle on an island where it took root and was given the space to grow. Drawing by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

 

The Illuminators

November 14, 2018

Illuminators November 14

The Illuminators show up in an initial of “I” — design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

This is new exploration into the carriers of information that reflect basic humanity… the scribes and painters of illuminations were mobile artisans that transported ideas and styles throughout medieval Europe. Look for more creative folks to show up in the coming months…

Medieval art was collaborative in nature with different artisans working on different stages of projects. Students using hard-point styluses made of metal or bone, or graphite copied the work of masters. Sometimes books were created over multiple generations with flourished pinwork of later artists updated the look of a project. Artisans often mixed a quantity of color and applied it sequentially to different miniatures. Pigments were natural, organic, mineral, or manufactured. Washes were overlaid with tones of varied saturation to provide shadows or highlights. The best blue was manufactured from lapis lazuli; it was very expensive because it was imported from as far away as Afghanistan, so it was use only for luxury images.

We the people

Preamble to the Constitution of the United States scribed on November 6, 2018 by Meredith Eliassen.

Inspired by a poster by an unknown artist produced during the 1968-1969 student-led strike for educational equity at San Francisco State College that featured the Preamble in blue with the word “justice” echoed in deep red, this version employs the dynamic of empty space with diverse information vectors produced by words found in Chinese design.

Zen design dos not seek to recreate reality, but creates with artificial space relations that point beyond visible reality to the essence of reality with chi. Chi is life, force, or essence, which in design is reliant upon obtaining connection between the observer and the observed… between design and recipient through empathy or aesthetic harmony. Zen design utilizes the vital movement (information vectors) produced through the circulation of chi… to say without saying. Lao Tzu (533 BC) asserted in Tao Te Ching XI that Zen design is conceived within an emptiness where “being and not being engender each other…” taking equal advantage of was is, “just as we recognize the usefulness of what is not.”