In a recent post, I have the impression that rabbits might be asleep and not paying attention to completing the race… True, the old belief that plodding wins the race, but in the race of life, much strategy is needed to continue the race. This page has been loosely focused on minimalist texts and quotes that offer hope in a world seemingly filled with conflicting forces. It is going to increasingly be populated with creatures, including the Hare, that offer lessons within parables.

Rabbit1

A parable is a short story that illustrates a practical moral lesson; it is a simulative that expresses a relationship under which something else is figured. Many storytellers through the ages have used parables to reveal truths about human nature and relating to others in layered situations. I hope to continue this tradition in my own way.

A Jay ventured into an area with some peacocks during molting season. There were lots of feathers on the ground, but the feathers started to fly after the precocious jay tried to re-purpose some of the discarded plumage by tying them to his tail and head. He thought himself quite a sight and strutted towards the peacocks with great swagger.

Ah Oh Bird

Disheartened, the Jay was compelled to return to his own kin-birds. Design by Meredith Eliassen, 2017.

As he approached the group, the peacocks quickly recognized the cheat and plucked his borrowed plumes. Disheartened and naked (they removed some of his feathers as well), the Jay was compelled to return to his kin-birds. However, as the other Jays observed his behavior from a distance, they were equally annoyed.

Turning their backs to the Jay, the understanding among all the birds was clear: it is not only fine feathers that make fine birds.

It’s never wise to compare yourself to others.

Fish

Fish design by Meredith Eliassen, 2017.

Earlier in the day, a fisherman was drawing up a net from the sea that was full of all sorts of fish. While the big fish were all caught and hauled into the ship, a little fish escaped through the net mesh and swam back into the deep. As he crossed paths with more big fish, the little fish was grateful that his seeming insignificance was actually his safety net.

replenish harmony

Inspired by Zuni carving, this design is by Meredith Eliassen, 2017.

Frog sings the songs that summon the rains to our earth and cleanse and purify the soul as well as replenish harmony.

Frog Replenish Harmony Notecard

 

 

humming

Inspired by a Native American kachina doll motif, this design of a hummingbird warrior is by Meredith Eliassen, 2017.

The hummingbird warrior resides with each of us – the courage to fly in any direction: forwards, backwards, up and down, even as we appear motionless. Darting here, there, and everywhere this warrior embodies paradox that surfaces joy and love.

For Ian.

Hummingbird Warrior postcard

 

 

 

flowertime

Inspired by a Native American bear carving, this design is by Meredith Eliassen, 2017.

Bear has the ability to hibernate, the capacity to quiet the mind to digest life experiences. The power of introspection throughout winter seeking the sweetness of truth bears fruitage throughout flowertime.

Don’t Rush Flowertime postcard

Plodding

Aesop’s fable of the Tortoise and the Hare designed by Meredith Eliassen, 2017.

The Hare boasted of his speed within a congregation of animals: “I’ve never been beaten when I run at my full speed.” Then he put forth a challenge to all of his animal friends: “Does anybody care to race me today?”

The tortoise quietly stepped forward: “I accept your challenge.”

The Hare hopped up with delight: “That’s a joke? I could dance around you the whole way and still beat you!”

The Tortoise modestly responded: “Keep your boasting until you finish the race.” She glanced at the other critters with a curious grin: “You’re on.”

Soon a course was fixed and a start was made. The Hare darted forth at once and disappeared around a bend. Then paused to wait for the others to arrive… showing his contempt for the Tortoise and lay down to take a nap.

The Tortoise plodded on and on, patiently, carefully. The Hare awoke to see her just at the finish line and could not run fast enough to save the race.

All of the animals observed that plodding wins the race.

Aesop’s Tortoise and the Hare postcard

 

Sometimes life brings challenges that require us to go out into the world to seek help… in doing that we pass sign posts of our lives and meet people on a shared path that nobody expected to take… on that path much good can be found if one looks upwards and beyond the immediate situation. The “Survivors’ Hub” series came out of my need to do art… the designs are simple, and the textures are meditations. As I shared them with folks on my path, they understood…

Art Deco Birds - pink

Surviving requires unity of thought, purpose, and action despite adversity. The three birds in flight symbolize spiritual unity that brings healing individually and collectively. Design by Meredith Eliassen, 2017.

Survivors’ Hub Unity Birds Postcard

Survivor

“Survivor. I stumbled, fell, I cried, why, Abba! You lifted me, showed me who I was meant… to be… one step at a time.”

Nursery Rhyme

April 6, 2017

Nursery rhyme 1

“One, two, three, four, five. I caught a fish alive. Why did you let it go? It bit my finger so.” Design by Meredith Eliassen, 2017.

Nursery Rhyme Postcard

 

Nursery Rhyme Postcard

 

Is she good or bad…

March 28, 2017

Mask

Queen of the Night, or Königin der Nacht, is a major character in the Mozart opera called “The Magic Flute” (1791). “The Queen of the Night’s Aria”, “Der Hölle Rache” in act II inspired this drawing by Meredith Eliassen, 2017.

In a fantastical world of ferocious serpents and enchanted musical instruments, a noble prince sets out to rescue a beautiful princess and ensure that truth and justice prevail…

A serpent chases young prince Tamino through a valley. He is rendered unconscious, and three ladies kill the snake. Tamino awakens with the assumption that a good natured bird catcher named Papageno killed the snake. Once Papageno takes credit for heroics of the three ladies, they reappear and padlock his lips to prevent further white lies. The ladies show Tamino a portrait of Pamina, the beautiful daughter of their mistress, the Queen of the Night. He is immediately smitten. The ladies inform Tamino that Pamina has been kidnapped by an evil magician named Sarastro. The Queen appears and asks Tamino to rescue Pamina, and he agrees. The ladies free Papageno and give him a magic set of chimes. They also give Tamino a magic flute and send the two off on their mission. Papageno comes across Pamina who is being seduced by her villain captor named Monostatos. Frightened, Monostatos runs off, leaving Papageno to tell Pamina that her rescuer is close. Three boys lead Tamino through Sarastro’s realm. He tries to enter the three temple doors, but is turned away from the first two. At the third door, a priest greets him and informs him that the Queen is evil and that Sarastro was merely trying to prevent Pamina from getting under her mother’s dark influence.

“Der Hölle Rache” Notecard