Albers17

17 features letterform “Q” with eye bead motif, design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Albers18

18 features Yerushalmi letterform of “tzadi” with trail bead motif, designed by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Albers19

19 features Sephardi letterform of ‘kopf” with ancient eye bead designed by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Albers20

20 features Tibetan letterform of “tsa” with ancient eye bead motif designed by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

More free studies…

August 7, 2018

Albers 21

21 features Greek letterform of “upsilon” designed by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Albers 22

22 features a light green base color, design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Albers 23

23 features a light blue base color, design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Free studies… X Y Z

August 6, 2018

Mosaic millefiore glass bead motifs from the nineteenth century were made with ancient techniques developed in western Asia where composite case canes of preformed unites were fused together to create colorful complex designs.

Drawings8:6

24 features a light blue base color, design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Albers 25

25 features a red base color, design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Albers 26

26 features a mauve base color, design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

hungry rooster

“Hongry rooster don’t cackle w’en he fine a wum.” Words from “Uncle Remus and his Friends”(1892) and drawing by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

associationof ideas

Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880) began her career almost two centuries ago, and some of her writing is dated, yet some resonates today in odd ways. She address the contradiction in American society as to whether to conserve of consume with her association of ideas. Child also offered this thought: The United States is a warning rather than en example to the world.” This odd group including a bird, bees, a squirrel, a whale, a wax doll, and a horse appeared in “Fanny’s Menagerie,” Rainbows for Children (Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1847): 119-131. Design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

lucky spirit

Lucky Spirit design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018. Notecard

This summer I have decided to take a break and play with color using Josef Albers Interaction with Color. Though I am not using colored papers, as he recommended, I am exploring his exercises, and in the coming weeks I will share some results.

rosehip

Rosehip design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Even in comparing these to designs employing the same colors, the colors show that they have different interactions.

For a wanderer…

July 14, 2018

lax soul quote

“The soul cannot rest in the landscape, no matter how fine.” Words from “In the Beginning was Love: Contemplative Words of Robert Lax,” edited with an introduction by S. T. Georgiou (2015), design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Notecard

Summertime…

June 27, 2018

butterflies:flower

Two butterflies explore summertime, design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

Summertime Notecard

Summer lull…

June 25, 2018

yerba buena

In a quiet moment… a drawing of some neighborhood yerba buena by Meredith Eliassen, 2018.

River wood

Lydia Maria Child is best remembered for her joyful poem, “The New England Boy’s Song about Thanksgiving Day,” better known as, “Over the River and Through the Woods,” first published in 1844, which conveys human/nature inter-reliance in everyday life. Design by Meredith Eliassen, 2018. Notecard

Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880) began her career during the 1820s, and was well established as a prominent social activist by the 1860s. Her longevity as a writer (55 years) placed her intellectually between the changing democratic antebellum order of the Second Great Awakening and Transcendentalism in post-bellum cultural reforms. Child’s career was well in advance of other activists who sought increased moral political input related to family stability such as the abolition of slavery (1830-1860), child labor reform (1870-1930), child welfare (1890-1930) and women’s suffrage (1900-1920). She was an untiring proponent for the rights of Native Americans and the humane treatment of animals first within the genre of prescriptive literature that shaped women’s everyday lives and then within broader literary genres where a dichotomy emerged between the two didactic genres in relation to a movement to start animal protection societies in the United States.